DNA research deployed in war on cancer scoops Nobel Prize

Professors Sara Snogerup Linse, Goran K. Hansson and Claes Gustafsson, members of the Nobel Assembly, talk to the media at a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy in StockholmBy Daniel Dickson and Ben Hirschler STOCKHOLM/LONDON (Reuters) – Three scientists from Sweden, the United States and Turkey won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for working out how cells repair damaged DNA, providing new ammunition in the war on cancer. Detailed understanding of DNA damage has helped drive a revolution in cancer treatment as researchers develop new drugs that target specific molecular pathways used by tumor cells to proliferate. Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar won the prize for "mechanistic studies of DNA repair".

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Mass immigration is damaging Britain, says Cameron’s interior minister

Britain's Home Secretary Theresa May speaks on the third day of the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester northern BritainBy William James MANCHESTER, England (Reuters) – Mass immigration is damaging British society, Conservative interior minister Theresa May said on Tuesday, promising a tough approach on an issue that will influence Britons&; choice of whether or not to leave the European Union. "When immigration is too high, when the pace of change is too fast, it&039;s impossible to build a cohesive society," May, seen as a possible future leader, told a party conference in the northern city of Manchester. Mass immigration strained public services like schools and hospitals, depressed wages and pushed people out of work, she said, describing the economic benefits as "close to zero".

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Chinese herbal expert among Nobel medicine prize winners

The portraits of the winners of the Nobel Medicine Prize 2015 (L-R) Irish-born William Campbell, Satoshi Omura of Japan and China's Youyou Tu are displayed on a screen during a press conference of the Nobel CommitteeA trio of scientists earned the 2015 Nobel Prize for Medicine on Monday for unlocking revolutionary treatments for malaria and roundworm, helping to roll back two parasitic diseases that blight millions of lives. Tu Youyou of China won half of the award for her work in artemisinin, a drug based on ancient Chinese herbal medicine, the Nobel jury announced. Irish-born William Campbell and Satoshi Omura of Japan shared the other half for an anti-roundworm treatment dubbed avermectin, derived from soil-dwelling bacteria.

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