Jury picking resumes in Baltimore’s Freddie Gray killing trial

Protestors gather outside of the courthouse on the first day of jury selection for Baltimore Police Officer William Porter who is charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray in BaltimoreJury selection resumes on Tuesday in the trial of the first of six police officers charged in the death of a black man from an injury in police custody that triggered rioting and fueled a U.S. debate on police brutality. Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams on Monday told the roughly 75 potential jurors that opening statements in the trial of Officer William Porter would take place as soon as Tuesday or Wednesday. The death of Freddie Gray, 25, in April followed police killings of black men in other cities, including New York and Ferguson, Missouri.

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Costly ‘cleaner’ coal fights for space in emissions debate

Smoke billows out from the cooling towers of a coal-fired power plant in Ahmedabad, IndiaBy Krishna N. Das, Tommy Wilkes and Yuka Obayashi NEW DELHI/TOKYO (Reuters) – The global coal industry is trumpeting "cleaner coal" technology to fight bubbling competition from renewable energy, but the high costs of greener plants are proving a major obstacle in selling them to power-hungry countries such as India. The challenges are highlighted by the experience of Japan – despite a concerted push by Tokyo to take a lead in exporting the technology, only 7 percent of the power stations built or planned since 2010 with funds from Tokyo&;s export credit agency were of the most energy-efficient type, according to data from a group of NGOs.

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Brazil confirms zica virus link to fetal brain-damage outbreak

Pots with genetically modified male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are pictured before they are released in Piracicaba, BrazilBy Jeb Blount RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – A link between a form of fetal brain damage and the mosquito-born zica virus has been confirmed by Brazilian health authorities on Saturday. The link between zica, first medically identified as a new disease half a century ago, and birth defects has never been made. The virus, endemic in parts Africa, South America, Southeast Asia and some Pacific Islands, has until now been blamed for symptoms such as fever, mild headache, skin rashes, joint pain and conjunctivitis, or "red eye." Initial analysis shows that the virus can be passed to a fetus and that the fetus is at greatest risk from the virus during the first three months of pregnancy, the statements said.

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